[ Director: Mário Frota [ Coordenador Editorial: José Carlos Fernandes Pereira [ Fundado em 30-11-1999 [ Edição III [ Ano X

sexta-feira, 15 de setembro de 2017

What the EU risks by opening up its market to Brazilian sugar cane ethanol

DISCLAIMER: All opinions in this column reflect the views of the author(s), not of EURACTIV.com PLC.

Desplechin: "The damage from such a trade deal will also have a knock-on effect on European innovation."
[Adam Cohn/Flickr]

Emmanuel Desplechin is the Secretary General of ePURE, the European renewable ethanol association. 

On that score, a pending mega-deal between the EU and the South American bloc known as Mercosur doesn’t quite live up to its promise. By agreeing to open its markets to Brazilian ethanol, the EU will contradict its own efforts to increase renewable energy sources in transport, kill incentives to invest in new technology, and make life even tougher for Europe’s already struggling farmers.

After more than a decade of slow-going talks, the EU and the Mercosur nations are suddenly in a hurry to finish, wrapping up the largest trade deal ever negotiated by the EU perhaps even by the end of this year. But Brazil has made the deal conditional on getting access to the EU market for its sugar cane and corn-based ethanol.
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Ethanol makers criticise the EU’s ‘biased’ transport decarbonisation goals


The European Commission is in denial concerning the contribution of conventional ethanol to the EU’s transport decarbonisation goals post-2020, according to European ethanol producers.
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It would be a strange moment for Brussels to make such a move, considering it is at the same time pushing to phase out crop-based biofuels – including both Brazilian ethanol and renewable EU ethanol produced from European feedstock.

Which raises the obvious question: Why would the EU want to shrink the market for a fuel that helps it decarbonize its transport sector and reduce engine pollutants in today’s vehicle fleet, and then offer what’s left of that market to Brazilian producers and sugar cane farmers?
 
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